CHRISTIAN REEPMEYER
REEPMEYER CHRISTIAN
REEPMEYER CHRISTIAN
...
SPECIAL SCIENTIST
Archaelogical Research Unit
Archaeological Research Unit
12, Gladstonos str.
22893573
-
-
https://research.jcu.edu.au/portfolio/christian.reepmeyer/

Προσωπικό Προφίλ

Christian Reepmeyer holds a M.A. in Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology and Geography (2003) from the University of Cologne and a Ph.D. in Prehistory (2010) from the Australian National University. After a Postdoctoral Fellowship and a highly competitive Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award at the Australian National University, he was employed as a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at James Cook University (Cairns, Australia) until 2021. He is an Alexander von Humboldt Experienced Research Fellow (2020) and holds Senior Research Fellowships at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, College of Arts, Society and Education at James Cook University (Cairns) and the Cyprus Institute. He is an Honorary Research Fellow at the Australian National University (ANU).
My main field of expertise is the study of prehistoric movement, mobility and exchange from the empirical analysis of igneous rocks with geochemical techniques (EDXA, SEM, XRF (hand-held and lab-based), LA-ICP-MS). The geochemical data is combined with exchange and evolutionary ecology theory to understand prehistoric social interaction. My research impact has been in the application of scientific techniques to characterise ancient stone tools from Asia and the Pacific, which provide tangible evidence for prehistoric social and economic movements, often over thousands of kilometres of marine terrain. Further research focus is island archaeology, investigating island colonisation, human-environment interaction, impacts of climate change on late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer communities and early farming populations, and the emergence of complex societies in an island setting. In this context, we have recently applied LiDAR topographic data to the identification and investigation of fortification sites on the island of Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga, to understand the impact of warfare on the rise of social hierarchies.
 

I have a track record of 51 first authored and co-authored international journal articles and book chapters (1057 citations on Google Scholar, h-index of 19, i10-index of 27). These include articles in high-ranking international journals such as Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Journal of Archaeological Science and Antiquity (https://scholar.google.de/citations?hl=de&user=BU25ogMAAAAJ). I was able to secure >1.5Mio $A in competitive grants funding which enabled field seasons in primarily Southeast Asia and the Pacific (Palau 2010-2012, Indonesia 2013-2016, Tonga 2010-ongoing). In addition, I have led and participated in fieldwork in Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and more recently, Cyprus. I was involved in the successful inscription of the ‘Rock Islands / Southern Lagoon area’ site in Palau into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2012.

Reepmeyer, C., Ferguson, R., Valentin, F., Clark, G. (2021) The stone adze and obsidian assemblage from the Talasiu site, Kingdom of Tonga. Archaeology in Oceania 56: 1-16.
Moutsiou, T., Reepmeyer, C., Zomeni, Z., Kassianidou, V., Agapiou, A. (2021) Modelling the Pleistocene colonisation of Eastern Mediterranean islandscapes. PlosONE 00: 1-16.
O’Connor, S., Reepmeyer, C., Langley, M.C., Piotto, E., Mahirta (2021). Communities of practice in a maritime world: shared shell technology and obsidian exchange in the Lesser Sunda Islands, Wallacea. In: Bérénice, B., Blench, R., Galipaud, J.C. (Eds.), Sea nomads of South-East Asia: From the past to the present, pp. 28-50. National University of Singapore Press, Singapore.
Reepmeyer, C., Clark, G., Parton, P., Melekiola, M., Burley, D. (2021). Geospatial analysis of fortification placement on the island of Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga. In Clark, G., Litster, M. (Eds.), Warfare in Pacific Prehistory, Terra Australis, ANU E PRESS, Canberra.
Parton, P., Clark, G., Reepmeyer, C. (2021). High-resolution Lidar analysis of the Fisi Tea defensive earthwork at Lapaha, Kingdom of Tonga. In Clark, G., Litster, M. (Eds.), Warfare in Pacific Prehistory, Terra Australis, ANU E PRESS, Canberra.
Reepmeyer, C. (2021). Modelling prehistoric social interaction in the South-western Pacific: A view from the obsidian sources in Northern Vanuatu. From Field to Museum—Studies from Melanesia in Honour of Robin Torrence, pp. 137-148, Australian Museum Supplements, Sydney.
Reepmeyer, C., O’Connor, S., Mahirta, Kealy, S., Maloney, T. (2019) Kisar, a small island participant in an extensive obsidian network in the Wallacean Archipelago. Archaeological Research in Asia 0: 1-8. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2019.100139.
Bird, M.I., Condie, S.A., O’Connor, S., O’Grady, D., Reepmeyer, C., Ulm, S., Zega, M., Saltré, F., Bradshaw, C.J.A. (2019). Early human settlement of Sahul was not an accident. Nature Scientific Reports 9: 1-10. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42946-9.
Maloney, T., O’Connor, S., Reepmeyer, C., Mahirta (2018) Specialised lithic technology of terminal Pleistocene maritime peoples of Wallacea. Archaeological Research in Asia 16: 78-87.
Reepmeyer, C., O’Connor, S., Mahirta, Maloney, T., Kealy, S. (2016). Late Pleistocene/early Holocene maritime interaction in Southeastern Indonesia – Timor Leste. Journal of Archaeological Science 76: 21-30.

Profile Information

Christian Reepmeyer holds a M.A. in Archaeology, Cultural Anthropology and Geography (2003) from the University of Cologne and a Ph.D. in Prehistory (2010) from the Australian National University. After a Postdoctoral Fellowship and a highly competitive Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Research Award at the Australian National University, he was employed as a Senior Lecturer in Archaeology at James Cook University (Cairns, Australia) until 2021. He is an Alexander von Humboldt Experienced Research Fellow (2020) and holds Senior Research Fellowships at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, College of Arts, Society and Education at James Cook University (Cairns) and the Cyprus Institute. He is an Honorary Research Fellow at the Australian National University (ANU).
My main field of expertise is the study of prehistoric movement, mobility and exchange from the empirical analysis of igneous rocks with geochemical techniques (EDXA, SEM, XRF (hand-held and lab-based), LA-ICP-MS). The geochemical data is combined with exchange and evolutionary ecology theory to understand prehistoric social interaction. My research impact has been in the application of scientific techniques to characterise ancient stone tools from Asia and the Pacific, which provide tangible evidence for prehistoric social and economic movements, often over thousands of kilometres of marine terrain. Further research focus is island archaeology, investigating island colonisation, human-environment interaction, impacts of climate change on late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer communities and early farming populations, and the emergence of complex societies in an island setting. In this context, we have recently applied LiDAR topographic data to the identification and investigation of fortification sites on the island of Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga, to understand the impact of warfare on the rise of social hierarchies.
 
I have a track record of 51 first authored and co-authored international journal articles and book chapters (1057 citations on Google Scholar, h-index of 19, i10-index of 27). These include articles in high-ranking international journals such as Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, Journal of Archaeological Science and Antiquity (https://scholar.google.de/citations?hl=de&user=BU25ogMAAAAJ). I was able to secure >1.5Mio $A in competitive grants funding which enabled field seasons in primarily Southeast Asia and the Pacific (Palau 2010-2012, Indonesia 2013-2016, Tonga 2010-ongoing). In addition, I have led and participated in fieldwork in Africa, Asia, Australia, the Pacific, and more recently, Cyprus. I was involved in the successful inscription of the ‘Rock Islands / Southern Lagoon area’ site in Palau into the UNESCO World Heritage List in 2012.
Reepmeyer, C., Ferguson, R., Valentin, F., Clark, G. (2021) The stone adze and obsidian assemblage from the Talasiu site, Kingdom of Tonga. Archaeology in Oceania 56: 1-16.
Moutsiou, T., Reepmeyer, C., Zomeni, Z., Kassianidou, V., Agapiou, A. (2021) Modelling the Pleistocene colonisation of Eastern Mediterranean islandscapes. PlosONE 00: 1-16.
O’Connor, S., Reepmeyer, C., Langley, M.C., Piotto, E., Mahirta (2021). Communities of practice in a maritime world: shared shell technology and obsidian exchange in the Lesser Sunda Islands, Wallacea. In: Bérénice, B., Blench, R., Galipaud, J.C. (Eds.), Sea nomads of South-East Asia: From the past to the present, pp. 28-50. National University of Singapore Press, Singapore.
Reepmeyer, C., Clark, G., Parton, P., Melekiola, M., Burley, D. (2021). Geospatial analysis of fortification placement on the island of Tongatapu, Kingdom of Tonga. In Clark, G., Litster, M. (Eds.), Warfare in Pacific Prehistory, Terra Australis, ANU E PRESS, Canberra.
Parton, P., Clark, G., Reepmeyer, C. (2021). High-resolution Lidar analysis of the Fisi Tea defensive earthwork at Lapaha, Kingdom of Tonga. In Clark, G., Litster, M. (Eds.), Warfare in Pacific Prehistory, Terra Australis, ANU E PRESS, Canberra.
Reepmeyer, C. (2021). Modelling prehistoric social interaction in the South-western Pacific: A view from the obsidian sources in Northern Vanuatu. From Field to Museum—Studies from Melanesia in Honour of Robin Torrence, pp. 137-148, Australian Museum Supplements, Sydney.
Reepmeyer, C., O’Connor, S., Mahirta, Kealy, S., Maloney, T. (2019) Kisar, a small island participant in an extensive obsidian network in the Wallacean Archipelago. Archaeological Research in Asia 0: 1-8. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ara.2019.100139
Bird, M.I., Condie, S.A., O’Connor, S., O’Grady, D., Reepmeyer, C., Ulm, S., Zega, M., Saltré, F., Bradshaw, C.J.A. (2019). Early human settlement of Sahul was not an accident. Nature Scientific Reports 9: 1-10. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-42946-9.
Maloney, T., O’Connor, S., Reepmeyer, C., Mahirta (2018) Specialised lithic technology of terminal Pleistocene maritime peoples of Wallacea. Archaeological Research in Asia 16: 78-87.
Reepmeyer, C., O’Connor, S., Mahirta, Maloney, T., Kealy, S. (2016). Late Pleistocene/early Holocene maritime interaction in Southeastern Indonesia – Timor Leste. Journal of Archaeological Science 76: 21-30.